Nursing, Global

Health and Delivering

Universal Health

Coverage

  • 3 June, 2019
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  • Canadian Nurses Association and the International Council of Nurses co-host “Nursing. Power. Advocacy - Helping Nurses Deliver”, read the full press release below:

Our 2019 aim

Nurses are essential in transforming health care and health systems such that no person is left behind, without access to care or impoverished because of their need for health care.

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Health for All

Health for All means not just the availability of health services, but a complete state of physical and mental health that enables a person to lead a socially and economically productive life.

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Case Studies

Here you will find nurse-led initiatives that push the boundaries and showcase the abilities, skills and knowledge of the nursing profession across the globe.

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Resources

Becoming a voice to lead means talking to governments, community leaders, policy makers and investors. Here you will find everything you need to campaign for access to heath and universal health coverage, and to provide the evidence you need to convince others that health is a human right. Use our resource and evidence pack, our video, our posters, or our social media banners to spread the word and use your voice to lead!

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ICN Voice to Lead
ICN
3 June, 2019

Canadian Nurses Association and the International Council of Nurses co-host “Nursing. Power. Advocacy - Helping Nurses Deliver”, read the full press release below:

ICN Voice to Lead
ICN
29 May, 2019

‘I wanted to be much clearer and more impactful when trying to influence others’ - Professor Patsy Yates Read the full interview with our GNLI scholar here: http://tinyurl.com/y4fbgvfd Listen to her below:

ICN Voice to Lead
ICN
29 May, 2019

As the 72nd World Health Assembly came to an end yesterday, we have rounded up some of our delegates throughout the week and asked them to share their perspective and experience in representing the millions of nurses worldwide in front of world leaders at the highest health policy setting meeting. Watch below as some of your representatives go through their daily tasks at WHA and the work that goes into drafting an intervention and delivering it. All ICN's intervention documents can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/y7ryelm5 For a full insight and coverage of WHA, follow us on Twitter and follow the hashtag #WHA72 to see what everyone is saying around this event. All latest news and information is on www.icn.ch

ICN Voice to Lead
ICN
24 May, 2019

Day Five of the World Health Assembly yesterday was highlighted by the announcement of the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife. The decision, ratified at the 72nd World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva today, means the year-long celebration will coincide with the 200th anniversary of the birth of one of the founders of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale. ICN discussed the possibility of designating 2020 the Year of the Nurse and Midwife with WHO Director General last year and lobbied for its acceptance at the WHO Executive Board and the WHA, which is WHO’s governing body. Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said: “WHO is proud to nominate 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and the Midwife. These two health professions are invaluable to the health of people everywhere. ‘Without nurses and midwives, we will not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals or universal health coverage. ‘While WHO recognises their crucial role on a daily basis, 2020 will be dedicated to highlighting the enormous sacrifices and contributions of nurses and midwives, and to ensuring that we address the shortage of these vital professions. ‘I would like to thank the International Council of Nurses and the Nursing Now campaign for raising the status and profile of nurses and am proud to contribute to the recognition of their work.” ICN Chief Executive Officer Howard Catton said: ‘“This is a once in a generation opportunity for us to make a real difference for the profession, to raise its profile, to increase investment and to show the world just what we can do to improve health for everybody.’ Before the decision, ICN submitted a written intervention about the Year of the Nurse and Midwife. It said: ‘Designating 2020 as the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife will allow us to honour the nursing and midwifery contribution to health and wellbeing and celebrate the bicentenary of the birth of Florence Nightingale, one of the founders of modern nursing. This celebration will raise the visibility of the nursing profession in policy dialogue, and garner investment in the development and increased capacity of the nursing workforce. We encourage all stakeholders to use the unique opportunity of 2020 to invest in and support the development of nurse leaders. Nurses, as both leaders and implementers, will turn the ambition of achieving health for all people into a reality. ‘The adoption by the Health Assembly of the draft decision to designate 2020 as the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife is enthusiastically welcomed by ICN and the over 20 million nurses worldwide.’ Hu Qin, a nursing student from China, made an intervention on substandard and falsified medical products, on ICN’s behalf, urging governments to recognise the dangers posed by SF medical products on health, criminalise their production, and develop national plans, which include strong regulatory mechanisms and robust reporting systems. For those who don’t know, the WHA is the decision-making body of the World Health Organization (WHO): it determines the WHO’s policies, appoints its Director General and approves and oversees its budget. It is attended by delegations from all 194 Member States and only those country delegates can vote at the meeting. ICN’s special relationship with WHO enables us to take a delegation, to contribute to the debates and to influence the decisions that are made. ICN board member Karen Bjoro, who is the second vice president of the Norwegian Nurse Association, said having the ICN so well represented at the WHA is vital. ‘The World Health Assembly is the arena where national member states of the world meet to discuss and decide on health policy,’ she said. ‘The ICN delegation is critical to ensure that the voice of nurses and nursing is heard as part of that decision-making process.’ She said large portions of the agenda are relevant to nurses because we are the largest health workforce, and this year’s theme of Universal Health Coverage is especially relevant for nurses. ‘The role of primary health care (PHC) is critical to achieving UHC and this is an arena where nurses and midwives have a strong impact on the health of individuals, families and communities. She said in recent years some of the focus on PHC in the WHO’s 1977 Health for All 2000 global strategy, the 1978 Alma Ata declaration and the Millennium Development Goals (2000-2015) has dissipated and some of the goals have not been achieved. ‘We need to get it right this time, and that means nurses must have a front row seat. I do see more emphasis on nursing at the global level and WHO Director General Dr Tedros has been important in this change, but the message needs to trickle down to the national level. In many reports from countries there is still little mention of nurses.’ But she says this is changing, especially with the appointment of Elizabeth Iro as the WHO’s Chief Nursing Officer in 2017 and the WHO’s decision to designate 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and Midwife. ‘Having a WHO chief nurse has meant so much for increasing visibility and impact of nursing and midwifery at WHO, and nursing and midwifery globally. She called a meeting of senior nurses in government and others to provide orientation on important developments at WHO that are important to nursing and midwifery.’ Ms Bjoro said all nurses can play their part in promoting the profession, especially in 2020. ‘My message to our National Nurses Associations and the world’s 20 million nurses is get involved. This is our time, so get ready for an exciting Year of Nursing. It is up to us to do everything we can to have an impact that the world will not forget.’ The WHA continues tomorrow.